Indoor Living
nprfreshair:



Carrie Brownstein by Parker Fitzgerald


Sleater-Kinney Reunites, Announces New Album
Also: Carrie and Fred Armisen on  Fresh Air 

nprfreshair:

Carrie Brownstein by Parker Fitzgerald

Sleater-Kinney Reunites, Announces New Album

Also: Carrie and Fred Armisen on  Fresh Air 

ifc:

Reading Gatsby and being like..

ifc:

Reading Gatsby and being like..

wnycradiolab:

WE MAKE CARPETS does not make carpets. At least, not the kind of carpet you can walk on.”

Pictured above: fork carpet, paperclip carpet, crayon carpet, firework carpet, bottle carpet.

(via Colossal, of course)

Video Update for October 20th, 2014 in which our hero asks the question:

What is it that I should be doing here, anyway?…

jtotheizzoe:

NEW VIDEO!

How To See Time Travel

In this week’s It’s Okay To Be Smart, I’ll show you how to build your own cosmic particle detector and witness time travel with your very own eyes!

Earth is under constant bombardment from cosmic radiation. There’s sunlight, of course, but that’s the good stuff. Solar wind, the next most common variety, is mostly blocked by Earth’s magnetic field and diverted to the poles. But there are other, more distant sources of charged particles, too.

Distant stars, supernovas, and even other galaxies are constantly exhaling high-energy protons and atomic nuclei, subjecting Earth to a constant cosmic downpour. High in the atmosphere, the subatomic cosmic projectiles smash into gases like billiard balls, sending a rain of muons down towards Earth.

Just this second, dozens of these particles flew through your body. Each minute, 10,000 or so muons hit every square meter of Earth. They could have been a major force in shaping early life on this planet. The thing is, muons don’t live very long, and they shouldn’t be able to travel down to Earth. So how do they get here?

TIME TRAVEL!

Watch this week’s video to find out more.

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